3 Reasons Why You are Never "too old"

September 17, 2017 4 Comments

Photocredit: Dean Bradshaw 


If you are a competition lover like I am, this has been an amazing summer to observe the absolute best in the master's section of the Crossfit Games and I have to say, though, my favorite is watching the performances of the “older” athletes. There were quite a few athletes that were past the ages that we may normally associate with being in one’s “physical prime.” Many athletes in their mid-30’s on say that they are in the best shape of their lives right now. Who isn’t inspired by 41-year-old gymnasts and runners or a 65-year old who can climb a rope better than most grade-schoolers?

So what is the deal with this new longevity we are seeing among athletes?


Here’s what you need to know:

#1. The human body is constantly evolving

We do not yet know how far we can push ourselves. One of the most famous instances is the case of the 4-minute-mile. Nobody thought it could happen – however, once that “barrier” was broken, it happens (for very fit people, anyway) on a regular basis. The same thing is happening now with older adults. With improved training and techniques, as well as advances in equipment, some are even surpassing their college performances.


#2. Athletes get smarter and wiser with age plus, many have full-time jobs
This means that the volume of training is often reduced when compared to younger competitors. Therefore, older athletes tend to train smarter – not harder, and have (and give themselves) greater recovery time. An unfortunate truth for many is that recovery from injuries can take longer in an older adult, therefore, they are more careful with training techniques.

#3. The social support for competitive master’s athletes is continually growing

More people are continuing to compete in sports for longer. It is more acceptable right now for people of any age to take up a sport that they have previously discontinued or start a new sport. The Baby Boomers are one of the largest groups of those beginning new sports population, once they have retired from a full-time job or when the children have moved out of the house – they have the disposable income as well as more time to spend on this type of endeavor.

 


    "In fairly short time, I noticed...gains"

    And what does all of this mean for you?


    If you are not yet a Master’s-Aged competitor, you can still expect plenty of support for your sports plans, throughout your lifetime. There are growing opportunities to compete, from local to worldwide level, and coaching is evolving with the changing demographic.

    If you ARE a person wanting to take up a new sport or activity, the opportunities are endless. And the good news is, you need not to have necessarily been an athlete in your previous life to become one now. I have had the opportunity to work with people who are seasoned athletes as well as neophytes, who can compete at the same levels.




    This is a guest post from 
    Gina Sobrero, Ph.D., ACSM EP-C. As well as a Crossfit L-1 Coach and Consultant for several national fitness, nutrition, and supplement companies. Gina can be followed on Facebook and Twitter





    4 Responses

    Sue
    Sue

    September 22, 2017

    I was never an athletic person, I made life sytle changes at 52, crossfit has changed who I am, raised my confidence in myself. I may not ever compete, but I compete against myself daily.

    Mark Epstein
    Mark Epstein

    September 20, 2017

    At 56 I have been doing CrossFit for 4 years. I lifted in my 20’s, however I feel CrossFit has me in the best shape of my life.

    Nancy
    Nancy

    July 28, 2017

    I’m 74 and loving Crossfit

    Ellen
    Ellen

    September 02, 2016

    I started CrossFit in my 50s and wish it had been around when I was younger!! I love it. I am also an L1 and liove coaching!

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